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Closer Magazine Winter 2013-14

49 FOOD & TRAVEL www.fredolsencruises.com Chinese New Year In 2014 the Chinese New Year falls on 31st January. Many of the foods that are popular around New Year have symbolic meaning. Spring rolls resemble gold bars to symbolise wealth. Tangerines and oranges represent luck and good fortune. Pomegranate seeds signify new life; their red colour is symbolic of luck and happiness. Long noodles represent long life. A whole cooked chicken symbolises family unity. It is traditional, particularly in north China, to make dumplings (Jiaozi) together on Chinese New Year’s Eve and eat them at midnight. Jiaozi generally comprise of minced meat and finely-chopped vegetables wrapped in a thin piece of dough that’s cooked in boiling water. Shaped like gold ingots, it’s thought that the more Jiaozi you eat, the more money you will make in the coming year. Usually a coin is hidden in one of the dumplings, bringing good luck and wealth to the person who finds it. Also said to bring prosperity, Nian Gao (sticky rice cake) is a traditional Chinese New Year treat, often given as a gift. The main ingredients of Nian Gao are sticky rice flour, water and sugar. Pancake Day Shrove Tuesday is part of the Christian calendar, representing the eve of Lent. Otherwise known as Pancake Day or Mardi Gras (literally meaning ‘fat Tuesday’ in French), historically pancakes were made to use up any leftover fatty foods that were forbidden to eat during Lent. Whatever time of year you’re on board next make sure you pay a visit to our pancake station in the buffet restaurant. They have a variety of toppings available to suit your personal taste. After all, they’re so delicious, why wait until Pancake Day to enjoy them! Canarian Potatoes Papas Arrugadas, or wrinkled potatoes, is a typical Canarian dish. Not only are they tasty, they are also very simple to make. Boil some small potatoes in heavily salted water (about 200g of salt to 1kg of potatoes). Once you’ve drained them, a thin layer of salt crystallises on the skin, giving a hit of salt when bitten into. Traditionally they are served hot with Canarian sauces, Mojo Picon (a spicy red sauce usually made with garlic, chilli, cumin, dried peppers, olive oil and sherry vinegar) and Mojo Cilantro (a green sauce with the same ingredients – just replace the chilli and peppers with lots of coriander). For more information on the Canary Islands, see our feature on p34 Venice Spritz The Spritz is a wine-based cocktail that originated in Venice. Initially made with equal parts of white wine and soda water, the modern version usually includes a dash of bitter liqueur. Try out this recipe at home for a refreshing aperitif: 2 parts Campari or Aperol 3 parts Prosecco 1 part soda water Serve over ice in a wine glass with a wedge of orange.


Closer Magazine Winter 2013-14
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